Faith vs Knowledge (7)

Once we’ve determined how we can know of a supreme being and His standard of morality, Willard now moves into a discussion of Christ.  Deists believe in God – although He can’t be known, doesn’t interact with creation, etc.  But what does one do with Christ?  Whoever has seen me has seen the Father (Jn 14:9) seems pretty clear.  Jesus claims at least the same attributes or characteristics of the Father.  Based upon other texts e.g. Jn 1:1, I would go further to say the Father and Jesus are one in the same.  Therefore, those of us who are Trinitarians believe God has taken an active role in creation (in Jesus) and continues to do so through the Holy Spirit.

When we consider miracles, there are those who would disallow them based upon the miracle not following a “natural” set of laws.  As Willard so eloquently points out, “The inception of new life in the human female’s womb regularly requires the injection of sperm from a human male, dead people regularly stay dead, and on a regular basis water refuses to turn to wine even when spoken to” p. 125.  However, witnesses have recorded those very things happening in the Bible.  A virgin did conceive and give birth, the dead was raised to life, and water did turn to wine.  It’s important to note that these things were corroborated by more than a few people.

Natural laws are a reality.  But one must consider where those laws come from?  In other words, the laws didn’t create themselves or just happen.  But even so, if the law giver provides the laws, doesn’t he also have the ability to modify or counteract the laws?  If he has the ability and chooses to do so, supernatural events (or miracles) occur.

If one chooses not to believe in miracles, that is of course, their right.  However, disregarding truth simply because it can’t be explained is less than intelligent.  God has given us the opportunity to know Christ today through His supernatural events in the past and present.  I look forward to what we’ve been promised for the future.  Thoughts?

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4 Responses to “Faith vs Knowledge (7)”

  1. Larry L Says:

    Brother, the miracle lives in each of us. God built the whole known existance and man has been trying to find the bulding blocks ever since. To accept God for who he is and not try to put him in a box is a miracle in itself. I believe that my personal knowledge and faith comes from studying and absorbing God’s word and works as recorded by mankind before me. I don’t have to see a miracle to understand (Holy Spirit) that the maker of all things can change the rules to fit his needs and laugh when mankind says this can’t be done. Can we hang a star?

    • Larry,
      Agreed Larry. The greatest miracle of all is the atonement – Jesus (God incarnate) going to the cross for you and I. Wow!

      What Willard is simply setting out here is the misconception of scientists attempting to define knowledge versus natural laws. Obviously, their hypothesis doesn’t play out. Blessings!

  2. My brother had his hands suddenly appear with oil and glitter during a church service; his hands smelling of olive oil for days after. Being someone that has personally known him my entire life – know of his past struggles and unbelief’s to now, his utter belief and faith in Christ…(his belief in Christ came before the hands incident)…I can say, with a loud voice, that I believe that supernatural events happen…. but do you think God that if someone says they do not need miracles, God knows that and respects that; so, He does not make those miracles shown to those who do not believe or do not want to see?

    • M,
      While reading your post, I was reminded of the dialogue between the Pharisees and Jesus. He chastised them about having to see signs (over and over again). I believe in miracles today (the most important and powerful one being a soul being saved). However, miracles are supernatural. Perhaps that should go without saying,but it’s naive to think we can prompt God to do anything because of our belief or unbelief.

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