Horn of Plenty (2)

Yesterday, we began a discussion on the cornucopia or Horn of Plenty.  Our focus was to consider our blessings more than we consider our struggles.  Today, we continue that discussion.

Our text over the next few days will be from Luke 10.

After this the Lord appointed seventy others and sent them on ahead of him in pairs to every town and place where he himself intended to go.  He said to them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the laborers are few; therefore ask the Lord of the harvest to send out laborers into his harvest.  Go on your way.  See, I am sending you out like lambs into the midst of wolves.  vss 1-3 RSV

Once we understand our blessings are to be shared, it should change the way we live.  In reality, the struggle between living by the flesh versus living by the Spirit becomes evident here.  Our selfishness – our flesh – tempts us to receive God’s blessings but simply to horde them away for personal benefit.  The Apostle Paul might say, “My Brothers and Sisters, this should never be!”  We’re blessed to bless!

In the text Luke records, there are a few things I want to focus on:

1)  They were sent in pairs.

2) They were sent ahead of Jesus to prepare what He would eventually do.

3) They were to pray for other laborers.

4) They were described as lambs among wolves.

First of all, note Jesus sent them in pairs.  Other translations say “two by two.”  Luke’s attention to detail makes us pause and ask “Why?”  As much as we’ve talked about community, I’m sure you understand the necessity of relationships.  We need people to “walk beside us” in this world.  There will be times we can offer encouragement and then times we need encouragement.

Secondly, I find it reassuring that they were told to go to places Jesus would eventually go.  God knows where the harvest is to be done.  That takes a huge responsibility away from us.  You and I can’t change anybody.  Only God does that.  Yet He asks us to prepare those He will meet.

Thirdly, when we pray, do we pray for others who are affecting the harvest?  In other words, are our prayers focused more on our needs or on what God desires?  How we define prayer makes all the difference in the world – literally!

Finally, lambs and wolves typically don’t get along.  Wolves see a meal.  Lambs are weak.  Therefore, it often doesn’t work out.  Jesus uses the metaphor to describe those He sends.  There would be trouble.  People would give them grief.  But because they knew Jesus would come, they could rest assured in the success of the harvest.

These things are important as we discuss the Luke 10 text.  Luke is good about setting a foundation for us.  More tomorrow.

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4 Responses to “Horn of Plenty (2)”

  1. I am blessed to have others working beside me for the Kingdom of God. I agree that sometimes we are the encouragement and sometimes they encourage me. I am relieved that God is in control and not myself because I do such a miserable job sometimes. He did not ask me to do it all, he just asks me to go. He will give me the words to speak and the opportunities there.

    • “He did not ask me to do it all, he just asks me to go.” Love this! Your thought reminded me of 1 Cor 12. Be a hand or a foot or a toe – or whatever you’re called to be. Thanks for reading!

  2. The second point particularly struck me in the heart with some members of my family – so true – “we are told to go places Jesus will eventually go”. I guess that can mean in our neighborhood and as far as over seas… But it also means those that are very close to me. It’s God who does the changing once he’s there. Very reassuring indeed!

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